C.A.R.E. Chiropractic Clinic

 


Welcome to alternative and physical medicine. Our doctor is a chiropractic physician, with a fellow in acupuncture by two different organizations and a diplomat with the American Board of Chiropractic Acupuncture. He has studied with five different doctors of acupuncture. He is certified in Chinese herbal medicine and diagnosis, in western botanical medicine, in hypnotherapy, is a certified rehabilitation specialist, a certified industrial consultant, and certified in disability ratings. 


Dr. Weeks has a special interest in integrated medicine in the work place and on the playing field.


Many Americans have lost patience with the limits of conventional medicine. They’ve had it with an impersonal health care system that tends to disease rather than prevention. They’re fed up with high-tech wizardry that does not ease their pain and has many unwanted side effects.


Enter alternative medicine. More and more people now insist that such therapies as acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, massage and relaxation techniques succeed where all else has failed. Even hard-core skeptics are warming to Eastern approaches that acknowledge the healing connection between mind and body. The National Institutes of Health now has an Office of Alternative Medicine, and multimillion-dollar trials of alternative therapies are underway.


Just how widespread is the trend to alternative medicine among the general population? Recent studies estimate that 55% of Americans have tried unconventional therapies, spending about $27 billion. And since few insurance companies cover alternative care, people are paying for it out of their own pockets when they need to.


Alternative medicine is a very broad term that encompasses an array of holistic techniques for preventing and treating illness. Some of there therapies, such as acupuncture, massage, hypnotherapy and herbal therapies, have long, venerated traditions in Asian cultures and tend to be given somewhat more credibility by Western doctors than do certain newer practices like crystal healing. Though still a controversial area, increasingly more medical schools have courses on alternative medicine, and health maintenance organizations cover certain alternative therapies. In fact, some practitioners prefer the term “complementary medicine,” accentuating a partnership between Western and Eastern based options.


Although there are a wide variety of treatments that fall under the umbrella of alternative or complementary care, each unique therapy is governed by one guiding principle--the essence of which is to focus on prevention and take a holistic view of an individual’s physical, psychological and emotional health.